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How to get started thru-hiking

How-tobelinda kirkComment

Are you ready to take your hiking life to the next level? Do you daydream about the trail, wishing you could be out in the wilderness for days, weeks or even months at a time? It’s time for you to start planning that epic thru-hike you’ve always wanted to attempt. But with all there is to consider in such a massive undertaking, how do you get started thru-hiking? In this article, we answer your questions about getting started thru-hiking, defining the fundamentals and explaining the risks and rewards.

21-year-old adventurer and University of Bristol engineering student, Val Ismaili, will share the story of his recent expedition to become the first thru-hiker of the 1500km Transcaucasian Trail running through Armenia and Georgia at our upcoming EC Stories in Bristol and London.

21-year-old adventurer and University of Bristol engineering student, Val Ismaili, will share the story of his recent expedition to become the first thru-hiker of the 1500km Transcaucasian Trail running through Armenia and Georgia at our upcoming EC Stories in Bristol and London.

Completing a “long trail” in a single hiking season, which is generally March or April through September or October — that’s the short definition of thru-hiking. But there’s no fixed definition of what exactly makes a trail “long.”

Some say a trail becomes “long” at the 50-mile mark, but most experienced thru-hikers would consider that a brief stroll. For most who do it, thru-hiking is truly defined by its legendary top end: Thousands of miles, up to half a year on the trail, and hiking experiences from which you never return unchanged.

Not at all. Ideally, you should already be an experienced hiker before taking on a thru-hike but more important to success on the long trail is a strong mind, a solid will and a flexible nature.

Thru-hikers are often middle-aged or retired, even elderly. They’re often at a crossroads in life, looking for new challenges and new answers. Hikers who complete a 2,000-plus mile thru-hike typically have one thing in common — they really, really wanted to do it.

Yes, if your ambition is to thru-hike one or more of America’s classic long trails. A typical south-to-north thru-hike along the Appalachian Trail, which runs 2,190 miles across 14 states, takes five to six months.

But there are other long trails on which a thru-hike could take far less time. The 800-mile Arizona Trail, for example, could take less than two months to complete, crossing the state from Mexico to Utah.

Hiking a state-traversing or state-looping long trail close to home is a good way to get thru-hiking experience before taking one of the big multi-state hikes.

Most of the long trails popular with thru-hikers are well marked and well traveled, and there’s a kind of thru-hiking subculture on the three big U.S. trails that looks out for its own. But you still need to take a compass or GPS, trail guides and maps just in case.

Those who thru-hike alone, especially on the most popular long trails, aren’t always alone. There’s a thru-hiking social scene and sub-culture on the big trails, and one of the many rewards of the thru-hiking experience is meeting new and interesting people and creating close friendships strengthened by adversity and joy.

If you’re thinking about hiking with friends, relatives or your spouse, think again. Is your relationship strong enough to withstand the trials and petty annoyances that are sure to come up during several months in the wilderness? The company you keep on the trail can easily become the cause of your failure, just as it can be the main cause of your success.

That all depends on you and your decisions, your planning and your stamina. Are you starting your thru-hike at the right time to avoid dangerous weather? Do you have the right gear and the right attitude? Have you trained enough to safely complete this grueling walk?

That said, many long trails pass by towns with medical services and all the other comforts of civilization. You can always take a break and stay a few nights in a hotel. Also, along with the three big thru-hiking trails in the U.S., a network of “trail angels” gives thru-hikers aid, advice, necessities and treats.

Maybe. The tools of the thru-hike are essentially the same as those of a standard backpacking trip, so if you already have gear that you like there’s no reason to replace it. It all depends on how much weight you want to carry. Many thru-hikers use lightweight or ultralight gear, carrying only essentials and sleeping under tarps or in hammocks rather than tents.

You’ll need a backpack that you’ve tested and grown to love; you’ll need a lightweight but warm sleeping bag and pad; and you’ll need a lightweight, durable and waterproof tarp or tent.

Browse online and check out the many blogs, articles, posts, and podcasts by successful thru-hikers.

This article was written by hiking expert Tim Hull and was originally featured on the Adventure Junkies website.